DOMINIC SANDBROOK NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD PDF

In NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD, Dominic Sandbrook takes a fresh look at the dramatic story of affluence and decline between and Arguing that. Buy Never Had It So Good 1st Edition by Dominic Sandbrook (ISBN:) from Amazon’s Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Arguing that historians have been besotted by the cultural revolution of the Sixties, Dominic Sandbrook re-examines the myths of this controversial period and.

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Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Sandbroko. Never Had It So Good: Arguing that historians have been besotted by the cultural revolution of the Sixties, Dominic Sandbrook re-examines the myths of this controversial period and paints a more complicated picture of a society caught between conservatism and change.

He explores the growth of a modern consumer society, the impact of immigration, the invention of modern pop music, and the Britis Arguing that historians have been besotted by the cultural revolution of the Sixties, Dominic Sandbrook re-examines the myths of this controversial period and paints a more complicated picture neger a society caught between conservatism and change.

He explores the growth of a modern consumer society, the impact of immigration, the invention of modern pop music, and the British retreat from empire. He tells the story of the colourful characters of sandbroom period, like Harold Macmillan, Nefer Amis, and Paul McCartney, and brings to life the experience of the first post-imperial generation, from the Notting Hill riots to the first Beatles hits, from the Profumo scandal to the cult of James Bond.

do,inic Paperbackpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book, the first of two giving a social and political history of Britain in the Dojinic, has been on my radar for many years.

When it finally appeared on kindle, I thought that Sanebrook could ignore it no longer and decided to finally get around to reading it — I am glad that Neved did. Although this is the story of the Sixties, it begins in with the Suez crisis, and ends as the country heads into Dominic Sandbrook does a wonderful job of incorporating the cultural and the political.

He pain This book, the first of two giving a social and political history of Britain in the Sixties, has been on my radar for many years. He paints a picture of the country in those post war years, as rationing ended and there was a greater wealth and consumerism. With ITV competing with BBC and supermarkets challenging local shops, people had different choices which affected their everyday lives.

Never Had It So Good: A History of Britain from Suez to the Beatles by Dominic Sandbrook

However, this is still a society which clung to traditional views and politics. Even as Britain coped with its changed perception within the world, there is a longing for traditionalism and opposition to the influence of the US, especially on the young.

The book begins with Macmillan seemingly safe as Prime Minister, but he is rocked by major events and scandal — particularly the Profumo affair has a real impact on his influence.

Along with the Cold War, the threat of atomic war, the European Union, the changing Empire and immigration, satire was also an up and coming influence of public opinion.

At the end of this book, we have Harold Wilson as the leader of the Labour Nevef and it is obvious that political change is coming — and welcomed by most. As late asthere are those saying that Trad Jazz will be the dominant music of the Sixties, until Beatlemania burst onto the scene and into the charts.

Of course, inthe British Invasion will begin and London will suddenly swing into the Sixties proper. This is itt history at its best — readable, enjoyable and full of interesting snippets and humour. View all 8 comments. Nov 05, Antonomasia rated it really liked it Shelves: It wasn’t until months after buying this and sandhrook sequel White Heat in autumn that I found out the author was a Tory; already slightly regretting the purchase of these huge tomes, I was god less keen after that but still wanted to read about the era in detail.

Always alert for right-wing bias whilst reading the book, I was usually pleasantly surprised – for example Sandbrook’s assessment of contentious issues like immigration, trade unions and the Hda was even-handed if not actually leaning It wasn’t until months after buying this and its sequel White Heat in autumn that I found out the author was a Tory; already slightly regretting the purchase of these huge tomes, I was even less keen after that but still wanted to read about the era in detail.

Always alert for right-wing bias whilst reading the book, I was usually pleasantly surprised – for example Sandbrook’s assessment of contentious issues sandgrook immigration, trade unions and the EEC was even-handed if not actually leaning to the left and he presented many statistics and arguments in favour of them at the time.

He made Harold Macmillan incredibly likeable; I already knew of him as probably the most progressive Conservative PM we’ve ever had but knew little about him as a person. A few goos biases were, however, present.

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Macinnes comes in for much stick for being a posh class tourist and for exoticising and positive-stereotyping West Indian immigrants. I read Macinnes’ Domknic Beginners before finishing this book and what it seems to me to domijic is a stage in the evolution of attitudes: It’s just that he can’t stop mentioning his friends’ races, dminic seems like a legacy of pre-Second World War essentialism. Given some of Sandbrook’s own mildly questionable vocab choices though generally fair and liberal attitude when discussing immigrant people, I’d guess that he borrowed the “exoticising” criticism from somewhere else as extra ammo against a writer he already disliked and whose work probably can’t be ignored when discussing social change in late 50s and early 60s Britain.

He also doesn’t appear entirely comfortable with gay men; their legal and social situation gets a few pages within the section on spies, after the story of Burgess and Maclean the chapter later devotes 20 pages to Ian Fleming’s works alone and, invariably referring to them as homosexuals, he reports media slurs of the day in a sort of free indirect style, sounding not so much academically detached as perhaps slightly in agreement.

With big books, even when they have problems like that or the excessively detailed chapter on the succession of Alec Douglas-Home there can be so much right with them in the other odd pages that without nevr it’s easy to forget the flaws.

And this, generally, is readable and marvellously comprehensive. Often reading two pages made me feel as if I’d read at least ten, so dense is the information. When I knew subjects reasonably well – British New Wave films and pop music – he did neber a little obvious in presentation with one or two good bits missed out; still I always learned something I didn’t already know, wo you can’t include absolutely everything, even in a book this size.

Those chapters served as a barometer and I was confident that this was generally a very good and comprehensive overview of politics, culture and society of the time, albeit one focused on England rather than “Britain”.

Sandbrook’s general take on the time is about continuity more than change: I became very aware of reading a historian from the same generation as myself: Whilst it has some imperfections, this is a great summation of many of the features and preoccupations of the era including new consumer goods and materialism, trade unions, the old-school-tie Establishment, the satire boom, spies both real and fictional, increased homophobia, the rise of television, the Keeler affair, immigration from the Carribbean and the Indian subcontinent, the satire boom, rock n roll, trad jazz and the Beatles, well-paid working class youngsters, the decline of Empire and failure to keep up with Western Europe in modernising industry.

And the post-war Butskellite consensus, which for those of us with social-democratic inclinations, seems like the best British party politics has ever been. View all 3 comments. This was a great read that covered a wide range of subjects and areas within Mr Sandbrook’s first period of his history that will run into the s.

The lead up and the eventual Suez crisis debacle sets the scene for a Britain that will begin to question its roots, establishment and direction. Mr Sandbrook covers taxes and the strength of Sterling to the prosperity and consumer boom with a growth in disposable income for some sections and age groups with a rise in membership of clu This was a great read that covered a wide range of subjects and areas within Mr Sandbrook’s first period of his history that will run into the s.

Mr Sandbrook covers taxes and the strength of Sterling to the prosperity and consumer boom with a growth in disposable income for some sections and age groups with a rise in membership of clubs, the increased prevalence of electricity leading to more refrigerators, TVs and car ownership and holidays. The author writes with great ease, quality and insight as he discusses literature of period including the unlikely friendship of Kingsley Amis and Philip Larkin, to milk and Expresso sic coffee bars; and the scandal of the Profumo affair and the spies and ministers of a wartime generation who acted and sounded differently to literary figures such as James Bond and George Smiley who challenged in outlook, popularity and approach.

However, as we close with the end of the Beatles are atop the charts and a Labour Government is just around the corner, and it is clear to see the White Heat Mr Sandbrook’s title of the next volume and future PM Harold Wilson’s famous words of technology and science hanging in the wings for a nation on a great and seismic journey – and as a reader I’m enjoying the ride too.

Dec 03, Daniel rated it really liked it. Class is just as important in America, to be sure, but America traditionally has been ruled by lots of smaller elite classes wealthy New England merchants, South Carolina plantation owners, etc. Dominic Sandbrook’s thesis emphasizes the essential conservatism of the era, to be sure, but Britain struck me as a notably conservative, stable place even by Western standards of the day. So, for example, Sandbrook gives the impression that the loss of empire was never quite as divisive as one might have expected.

In France, the war in Algeria sparked a constitutional crisis, the downfall of the Fourth Republic, and an astonishing amount of political violence. In America, the rather more tenuous ‘loss’ of China prompted a scarring political debate that affected foreign policy for a generation.

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In Britain, it seems like opponents of decolonization couldn’t even muster a serious leadership challenge in the Conservative Party. The Suez crisis seems to me–and of course I could be wrong, since I’m a novice at British politics–as the exception that proves the rule; of course it ended in humiliation and the downfall of Anthony Eden, but the replacement of one center-right prime minister with another doesn’t seem that dramatic to me all things considered.

The lack of a British equivalent to McCarthyism is pretty striking as well. It’s remarkable to me that top officials in Whitehall and 10 Downing Street were able to simply decide not to air their own dirty laundry, and in that way keep a lid on serious controversy.

Whether or not Harry Truman might have done that, the fact of the matter is that he could never have gotten away with it. And perhaps this is why the Cambridge spy ring never quite seemed to be as big a scandal as it deserved to be. Certainly, there seems to have been a general suspicion of ‘the Establishment’ at that era, and newspapers would print stories about how many British leaders were descended from only four Victorian peers.

Never Had It So Good: A History of Britain from Suez to the Beatles

And I would have imagined that the Profumo scandal, which was both lurid and at least ostensibly connected to national security, would have proved the natural segue. Kim Philby’s career seems particularly damning, ot he nrver not only responsible for the deaths of British assets, not only permitted to escape justice entirely by fleeing to Moscow, he was publicly exonerated in Parliament sanfbrook the sitting Prime Minister.

But as ddominic asHarold MacMillan was able to go to Harold Wilson and get the Labour leader to agree to play down the scandal for ‘national security. But it seems like it should have been a big deal. Other things that jumped out at me: What’s striking to me is that–aside from the trope that American culture is corrupting Great Britain–their arguments are otherwise exactly the same as those made by American cultural elites.

I suppose I might say this again in my review of the next volume in the series, but seriously, what a prick. I was generally impressed with Dominic Neveg ability to deliver a pretty complicated historical narrative including political, social and cultural history in a way that’s engaging and clear even to somebody without a strong nver in the subject.

I really enjoy British history–I was joking to a friend that it’s as interesting as American history but I don’t have to feel responsible for any of it–so I am excited to read the rest of the series. Nov sandbrokk, F. Of course historians these days cominic have a literal view of the calendar inevitably, we can expect histories of The Noughties to begin on September the 11th, and given the effect The Suez Crisis had on British prestige, it seems sensible to begin there.

Sandbrook looks at the decade both politically and culturally, and the chapters pretty much split between the two. On the whole I think the political chapters are better value, s because there are more interesting points to unearth there. No matter what the TV footage shows of Carnaby Street, that was not the experience of the majority of the nation. Two anecdotes of this book which particularly made nevsr smile: The point of this exercise sandbroo, never entirely clear, but it takes little imagination to speculate that the evening did not unfold quite as the youth service would have wished.

And then along came John, Paul, George and Ringo. Dec 01, Michael Sterckx rated it liked it. I was worried that this was going to be an historical justification for Thatcherism, but Mr Sandbrook managed to keep his political opinions mostly at bay. His dismissing of British New Wave kitchen sink cinema was unfair though and he conveniently overlooked key films such as A Taste Of Honey which countered his argument that they were largely working class, chauvinistic and small c conservative in outlook.

The chapter on Profumo was interesting, as he seemed to be trying to deflect the sleaze I was worried that this was going to be an historical justification for Thatcherism, but Mr Sandbrook managed to keep his political opinions sancbrook at bay. The chapter on Profumo was interesting, as he seemed to be trying to deflect the sleaze away from the Conservative party and onto the press and he was also rather snobbish about Christine Keeler as well.

His argument that the sixties didn’t just come out of nowhere but was the culmination of four decades of modernistic progress is absolutely solid however. Oct 04, Lauren Albert rated it it was amazing Shelves: I was worried when I started this book–more than pages on such a short period of time.

I’m used to massive histories–but gold usually on such a small period of time. But Sandbrook did an excellent job. I criticized a book I read recently for the strange way it jumped from cultural to political and back.